The NO objective / outcomes lessons… Would OFSTED like it????

I’ve trialled the ‘NO OBJECTIVE / OUTCOMES’ lessons with my Year 7 gymnastics class.  I gave them a basic framework to the lesson – ‘ You are working on a sequence that needs to include these things (travel, level & shape)’.  I provided a ‘LEARNING BOARD’ where, at any point during the lesson, they could come up to me and explain what they had learnt (a new shape, how to mirror image, how long to hold a shape for etc..) and I would write it onto the board with their initials next to it.  Other students, without my instruction, were then coming up to the board to learn something new from one of their peers.  I then used the ‘Learning Board’ as a basis for discussion during mini plenaries throughout the double lesson.

I found this gave the students autonomy & control over their learning instead of dictating what will be learnt at the start of the lesson with a standard ‘Today you will learn’ objective or ‘by the end of this lesson you will be able to..’

The question is, what would OFSTED think of this ‘discovery’ approach?  Would it be possible to get an outstanding or even a good?

After the engagement created by using this process I’m not sure I’m bothered!!

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4 Responses to The NO objective / outcomes lessons… Would OFSTED like it????

  1. Meme Ratliff says:

    How old is a Y7 student? This idea sounds fabulous. How young of a class have you done this with? How many per class do you have? Thanks for sharing!

    • Hello there & thanks for the first ever comment on my blog!! If I had a prize I would give you one! Year 7 is 11 to 12 yr old. These are the youngest students I teach but I have used this idea now all throughout the age groups I teach (11-18 yr old). I find it a great way to engage the kids right from the start of the lesson as they have to think about what they are learning rather than being told what they are learning. Each kid might take something different away from the lesson and that is fine and dandy by me!! Any comments / feedback / ideas always welcome. Cheers, Matt

  2. Dave Gale says:

    Hi,
    I can’t comment on behalf of Ofsted inspectors but as a teacher, there’s a lot to like.

    I wouldn’t really say there were “no objectives/outcomes” but more that there were “no objectives/outcomes explicitly shared”. For me, this is totally fine. As a maths teacher, I pretty often don’t tell them what we’re doing, especially at the start of the lesson. How on earth do you create a sense of wonder, mystery and curiosity if you tell the students outright exactly what they’re going to be learning?

    Paul Ginnis (@paulginnis) recently tweeted something along the lines of “It’s still happening. Being told off by a jobsworthy and yawnworthy Ofsted inspector for not writing objectives on the board at the start of the lesson”.

    • I saw that post by @paulginnis and had a little chuckle to myself. I could not agree more with your statement,’As a (maths) teacher, I pretty often don’t tell them what we’re doing, especially at the start of the lesson. How on earth do you create a sense of wonder, mystery and curiosity if you tell the students outright exactly what they’re going to be learning?’

      Next week I am presenting in assemblies about an ‘Innovation Day’ I am coordinating. The tag line is ‘What’s your spark?’ Y7 to Y10 students will apply to work on a project of their choice for a whole school day. Teachers are completely hands off & will be present just to encourage & prompt when needed. The idea is basically a Google 20% time for schools where kids will have complete autonomy over their learning. Ideally, if successful with this first day, these ‘Innovation Days’ could be embedded into the school timetable – once a fortnight / half term. I’ll post about this in the next few days.

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